Category Archives: Perennial vegetables

Hosta nutrition

A nutritional analysis of Hosta is reported in the enclosed open access article from Japan (2017):  “Analysis of essential macro-micro mineral content of twelve Hosta taxa” by Mehraj, Nishimura and Shimasaki.  The good news is that the overall conclusion is that Hostas are  excellent sources of a number of minerals important in human nutrition!
Various Hosta species were collected from the wild as well as from commercial vegetable growers (it is indicated that the Hosta were simply collected from the wild and are not selected otherwise), they were grown for a year in the open before being moved to pots for the analysis.

A few quotes:

“Hosta plant leaves have higher K and P content than that of the other (common) leafy vegetables.”

“We found one species (H.  sieboldii) among the studied 12 species containing 1.15% of Ca, higher than STFC-2015, Japan and all levels found in other studies conducted in different countries for various wild edible plants. Data from our study indicated that H. sieboldii could be an excellent daily diet source of Ca. It appears that Japanese people used to consume this species as a source of calciums. The results of this study indicate that hosta taxa are a good source of Mg and Mn.”

“The Zn content of hosta leaves was higher than other fresh vegetable reported”

“Hosta plant leaves contained higher minerals than that of asparagus. From the results and discussion, it is clear that hosta leaves are a very good dietary source of minerals.”

“H. alismifolia, H. sieboldii, H. nakaiana, H. longissima, H. montana can be considered excellent sources of some minerals and can be recommended for their K, Ca, Fe, P, Mg, Zn content.”  (NB! H. montana is often considered as a synonym or subspecies of H. sieboldiana)

Download (PDF, 265KB)

Variegated Hablitzia on Nesodden

I visited my son today on Nesodden (Oslo) and was impressed  by how much growth his Hablitzia had put on and then I noticed that one of the stems had variegated leaves…I’m not sure if this is the same plant as the stems with normal leaves…will try to check on my next visit!

Sweet and sour stir-fry ingredients

Last night’s ingredients for a “sweet and sour” stir fry: (from left to right) – Allium cernuum (chicago onion / prærieløk),  Crambe maritima (sea kale / strandkål) broccolis, sweet cicely flowers and young seeds (spansk kjørvel), Arctium spp (burdock / borre) flower stems (sweet), flower stems of Heracleum maximum (cow parsnip) (also sweetish), Rumex patientia (patience dock / hagesyre), Campanula latifolia (giant bellflower / storklokke) tops and Bunias orientalis (turkish rocket / russekål) broccolis! Delicious!
(the flower stems are first peeled to remove the coarse outer layer)

Late May flowers in the Edible Garden

A selection of late May flowers in the Edible Garden:

Udo salad

Walking past the Udo (Aralia cordata) patch yesterday morning I noticed that the shoots had outgrown their bucket and, as usual, had thrown the bucket down the hill, eager for some sunshine. Sad for it, its effort was in vain as they were bound for the kitchen! Here’s an album of pictures showing how I prepared the udo salad.
I alsø blanced Arali racemosa for the first time, but haven’t tried it yet…

The bucket of cordata let some light in at the top, so the shoots were greener than for A. racemosa