A year in the life of the Persian Shallot

I bought my original plant  as Allium hirtifolium,  a perennial ornamental onion, only later having it identified by my onion friend Wietse Mellema as Allium altissimum, one of at least three botanical species mostly wild collected in West Asia as Persian Shallot (mooseer). Wikipedia: “Most of those eaten are harvested from the wild, sliced, dried, and sold at markets. Buyers will often soak the shallots for a number of days then boil them to obtain a milder flavour. They are often crushed and mixed with yogurt.”
The yield in my garden has been amazing; I’ve given up growing ordinary shallots as the yield is poor…. However, I don’t know yet how quickly these bulbs grow from seed. I’ve therefore collected seed this year…if they grow as quickly as I think they do, this could be one of the best perennial bulb onions for cold climates (and edimental as a bonus)!  Here’s an album of pictures of this very tall Allium (altissimum means tallest!). Other species known as Persian Shallot are A. stipitatum and A. hirtifolium.

http://s304.photobucket.com/user/stevil2008_photo/library/Facebook/A%20Year%20in%20the%20Life%20of%20the%20Persian%20Shallot%20Allium

Today, 28th February 2015, the lovely pink-tipped shoots are appearing:
P1000232

4 thoughts on “A year in the life of the Persian Shallot”

    1. I can only see snow on the mountains and there’s no frost in the ground either in parts of the garden. I prepared a bed and sowed carrots and parsnips earlier on! It’s April, one month early….

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Edibles & ornamental plants

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