Perennial vegetables webinar on Youtube

The recording of webinar last week on perennial vegetables is now up on Youtube:
https://youtu.be/DO_BdCXqaE0

The webinar was part of the course “Ett år i Omställning” (one year in transition) organised by Eskilstunas folkhögskola (folk school), Omställningsnätverket (Swedish transition network) and with support of Hela Sverige ska Leva.
A special thanks to the coordinator Emilia Rekestad who also organised my first webinar on Winter Vegetables: https://www.edimentals.com/blog/?p=16704
Please share!
 

Perennial Myrrhis Sprouts

Sweet cicely (spansk kjørvel) is considered to be one of the worst invasive plants here and is now banned for sale and we don’t offer it through the Norwegian Seed Savers catalogue / yearbook.  However, it’s one of the best edible perennials. It’s never spread in my garden as I’ve always eaten it, the best way to stop it spreading. In particular, eating the delicious flowers (in salads) and immature seeds (the best candy for kids) and collecting the mature seeds for winter sprouting, the best sprouts for winter stir-fries (sweet anise taste and a good size). 
This year, I sowed the large seeds in a large pot and stratified outside for a couple of months before moving into the cellar where the temperature is warmer than usual this winter and there was mass germination a couple of weeks ago. A few will be used in a chinese style stir-fry tonight!
Eat your invasives!
 

Redpoll workers

Today at the Ringve Botanical Gardens I found the Allium garden was full of little workers eating the masses of birch seeds that had fallen during the winter….saving me a lot of work later. The first summer, there were thousands of birch seedlings in the garden…

Record early Robin

Ever since I moved here in 1984, it’s been one of the year’s highlights to hear the first robin (rødstrupe) singing in the spring and I’ve recorded this event every year since. However, it’s with mixed feelings that I woke up to this year’s first song this morning, a full 7 weeks earlier than what was normal in the 80s and 2 weeks earlier than my previous record. In the city, birds have been heard singing since January in the record mild January here…
A great tit (kjøttmeis) accompanies the robin in the second video!

Dennis’ veggies

As Storm Dennis brought similar temperatures to southern England to Malvik, this was today's harvest from the garden....more like mid-April.
These were used in a stew:
Alliaria petiolata / hedge garlic / løkurt
Hablitzia tamnoides / Caucasian spinach / stjernemelde
Taraxacum officinale / dandelion / løvetann
Allium cernuum / nodding onion / prærieløk
Allium carinatum / keeled garlic / rosenløk
Ficaria verna / lesser celandine / vårkål
Brassica oleracea / perennial kales / flerårige kål (flere)
Dystaenia takesimana / Korean celery / Koreansk selleri
Rumex acetosa / sorrel / engsyre
Rheum x rhabarbarum / rhubarb / rabarbra

First leafing again

When I was away in January, the mildest ever recorded in this part of the world, this bird cherry that I received as Padus asiatica leafed out for the third year running in January, here seen with my only misteltoe (top left):

My only Rhododendron, R.  mucronulatum v. taguettii from Jeju Island in Korea is also early out and full of flower buds, so I brought a few twigs indoors:

Waxwings are still here

Although not as many as before Xmas there are still flocks of waxwings (sidensvans) around, more than normal at this time of year. Usually, most have left by now! Yesterday, they were eating hawthorn (hagtorn) berries, their last choice.