Fasciated Martagon Lily

From Wikipedia : Fasciation (pronounced /ˌfæʃiˈeɪʃən/, from the Latin root meaning “band” or “stripe”), also known as cresting, is a relatively rare condition of abnormal growth in vascular plants in which the apical meristem (growing tip), which normally is concentrated around a single point  and produces approximately cylindrical tissue, instead becomes elongated perpendicularly to the direction of growth, thus, producing flattened, ribbon-like, crested, or elaborately contorted tissue”

This deviant martagon lily (Lilium martagon) turned up in my garden in 2014. Martagon lily have one of the best tasting lily bulbs, and is a good edible for the forest garden as they are shade tolerant :)10374966_10152453461250860_4441261138567187365_n10418896_10152453461315860_6374752471051598322_n

 

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This is what happened when I ate it ;) I’ve now fully recovered :)

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Korean Aster on Edimentals

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Two years ago, I posted this picture of Aster scaber, commonly wild foraged in Korea and nowadays cultivated for markets in Korea and exported dried to Koreans in North America :)
The following is a collection of pages here  giving more information on this great perennial vegetable, or read the account in my book Around the World in 80 plants :)
1. Aster scaber and introducing Misoni: http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?page_id=3103
2. Pakora hasn’t met this selection of vegetables before:http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?p=5250
3. The wild greens of Korea: http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?p=3635
4. Perennial vegetable tempura: http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?p=2382
5. My first Korean aster flower: http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?p=2008
6. Alexandra Berkutenko and the giant Edimentals of the Russian Far East:http://www.edimentals.com/blog/?p=208

Central Park with Leda Meredith

I’ve “known” forager Leda Meredith since 1999 on the Edible Wild email list run by Melana Hiatt! I was very happy when I was passing through New York headed for Vermont and Ottawa early  in September 2014 that she agreed to meet me early on a Friday morning in Central Park to show me her foraging grounds!
I sadly only had about an hour in Leda’s company, but we managed to cram in a lot of edible plants in a short time….here’s some of them :)
This album was earlier shown on Facebook and was re-erected more permanently here for two reasons – my Norwegian FB friend Stein Tofte showed a picture of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana, growing in his garden at Randaberg near Stavanger – his plant came from seed collected in Central Park :) It’s also Leda’s birthday today….so this is for you, HAPPY FORAGING BIRTHDAY!!

Adenophora transforms into invasive bellflower

On the corner of a bed I planted Adenophora “Amethyst” over 10 years ago. I remember that creeping bellflower / ugressklokke (Campanula rapunculoides) was growing in the grass next to the bed and I tried to stop it invading… I thought I had succeeded…
In the last few years the “Adenophora” has started invading this bed aggressively and I decided to remove the plant….. It turned out not to be an Adenophora at all and was creeping bellflower (both in the same family). So, had the creeping bellflower in the grass gradually taken over without me noticing or was my Adenophora (seed propagated from a seed trade) actually always been creeping bellfower. The latter I think. It seems that it is often an imposter for Adenophora: http://tinyurl.com/j3kzq9k

I’ve dug it out, the roots were a decent size although a bit fibrous, so I cooked them and added them to tonight’s salad :)

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Drying berries

A bit of a glut of fruit in my garden. I’ve therefore been drying raspberries and currants :)  At the bottom are the dried fruit, also bilberries and saskatoons!

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The red variety is a tasty disease resistent variety we found escaped from the old Malvik railway station garden below the house. There are two yellow varieties, one just received as gulbringebær (yellow raspberry), the lighter coloured one that is almost white when unripe is called “White Russian”
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The red variety is a tasty disease resistent variety we found escaped from the old Malvik railway station garden below the house. There are two yellow varieties, one just received as gulbringebær (yellow raspberry), the lighter coloured one that is almost white when unripe is called “White Russian”

 

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Redcurrants / rips
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Redcurrants / rips

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Zealand Celery and Porpoise Bay

I haven’t shown many pictures from my fantastic tour of New Zealand in March / April 2015. I was transplanting some plants of New Zealand Celery at the weekend, the seed of which I collected on rocks at Porpoise Bay in Southland! A good excuse then to show a few pictures from Porpoise Bay :)

Edibles & ornamental plants

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