Stampede=Dayneutral=Dwarf Sunray=Bianca

Stampede is a North American Jerusalem Artichoke variety , the name alluding to the fact that it is fast growing . Here’s the description in Cornucopia II.
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Stampede still in flower on 24th October 2015

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I first grew a variety called Dagnøytral (Dayneutral) which was long recognised as the best variety here in Norway as, unlike other varieties, it produces good yields in our long days (hence the name). I was later given  a variety from Sweden called Bianca (Bianka). introduced to Scandinavia from Russia in the 1970s by a well known Swedish veggie gardener here called Ake Truedsson. They were for me identical, flowering at the same time and morphologically difficult to tell apart, both with knobbly tubers. Next I got Dwarf Sunray from Danish Seed Savers (in 2004) and that also developed to an identical plant  :)

Reading the description of Stampede in Cornucopia II (picture), I began to wonder if all originated from / were identical to that Native American variety, so I asked on the Homegrown Goodness forum if anyone could send me a tuber. In December 2008 I received 3 tubers from Bunkie Weir in the US and, guess what, the flower buds of the Russian, Canadian and Norwegian plants emerged in perfect synchronicity!

According to Truedsson, Bianka is a widespread variety in Russia, perhaps taken there by Vavilov? Not surprising really that such a superior variety (yieldwise at least) should have spread around the world!

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Berries 17th October 2015

Sambucus nigra cultivars “Samyl” and “Samnor” – Ripe elderberries were impossible here until these new Danish cultivars arrived…ripe even in a bad summer!

Otherwise: Aralia cordata (Udo) and Aralia californica berries ready to harvest for trading seed…..

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Sambucus nigra “Samyl”
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Aralia cordata, Udo
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Aralia californica
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Sambucus nigra “Samnor”
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Aralia cordata has collapsed under its own weight next to Ostrich Fern

 

Perennial vegetables, Edimentals (plants that are edible and ornamental) and other goings on in The Edible Garden